Kindergarten Read Aloud Banquet



Nursery Songs for December

I Saw Three Ships



The Mulberry Bush



The North Wind and the Robin



Dance a Baby




A Child's Garden of Verses

Foreign Lands

Up into the cherry tree

Who should climb but little me?

I held the trunk with both my hands

And looked abroad on foreign lands.


I saw the next door garden lie,

Adorned with flowers, before my eye,

And many pleasant places more

That I had never seen before.


I saw the dimpling river pass

And be the sky's blue looking-glass;

The dusty roads go up and down

With people tramping in to town.


If I could find a higher tree

Farther and farther I should see,

To where the grown-up river slips

Into the sea among the ships,


To where the roads on either hand

Lead onward into fairy land,

Where all the children dine at five,

And all the playthings come alive.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 46 Johnny Chuck Is Kept Busy One Sunday (Part 2 of 2) The Three Bears The Travellers Go South How the Home Was Built The Trap Story The Story of the Spies
The Man of Derby Old Woman, Old Woman The Coachman Grey Goose and Gander There Was an Old Woman Old Mother Hubbard A Thorn
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Old Old Tales Retold  by Frederick Richardson
[Illustration]

dropcap image ONG ago there lived a pig who had three little pigs. The mother pig was very poor, and at last she had to send her little pigs out to seek their fortunes.




[Illustration]

The first little pig that went away met a man with a bundle of straw, and he said to him, "Please, man, give me that straw to build me a house."


[Illustration]

The man gave the straw to the little pig. Then the pig built a house of the straw, and lived in the house.

By and by a wolf came along and knocked at the door of the little straw house.


[Illustration]

"Little pig, little pig, let me come in!" called the wolf.

"No, no, by the hair of my chinny, chin, chin, I'll not let you in," answered the pig.

"Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house in," said the wolf.

So he huffed and he puffed and he blew the house in. Then he chased the little pig away.


[Illustration]

The second little pig that went away met a man with a bundle of sticks, and he said to the man, "Please, man, give me your bundle of sticks to build me a house."

The man gave the sticks to the little pig. Then the pig built a house of the sticks, and lived in the house.

By and by the wolf came along and knocked at the door of the little house of sticks.

"Little pig, little pig, let me come in!" called the wolf.

"No, no, by the hair of my chinny, chin, chin, I'll not let you in," answered the pig.

"Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house in," said the wolf.

So he huffed and he puffed and he blew the house in. Then he chased the little pig away.


[Illustration]

The third little pig that went away met a man with a load of bricks, and he said to the man, "Please, man, give me your load of bricks to build me a house."

The man gave the bricks to the little pig. Then the pig built a house with the bricks and lived in the house.

At last the wolf came along and knocked at the door of the brick house.

"Little pig, little pig, let me come in!" called the wolf.


[Illustration]

"No, no, by the hair of my chinny, chin, chin, I'll not let you in," answered the pig.

"Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house in," said the wolf.

So he huffed and he puffed and he puffed and he huffed, but he could not blow the little brick house in.

The wolf rested a few minutes, and then he said, "Little pig, little pig, will you let just the tip of my nose in?"

"No," said the little pig.

"Little pig, little pig, will you let just my paw in?"

"No," said the little pig.

"Little pig, little pig, will you let just the tip of my tail in?"

"No," said the little pig.

"Then I will climb up on the roof and come down through the chimney," said the wolf.


[Illustration]

But the little pig made the fire very hot, so the wolf could not come down the chimney so he went away, and that was the end of him.

The little pig then went and fetched his mother, and they still live happily in their little brick house.


[Illustration]