First Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for May

Jack and Jill



King Arthur



Lavender's Blue



Ye Frog and Ye Crow




The Little Turtle

There was a little turtle.

He lived in a box.

He swam in a puddle.

He climbed on the rocks.


He snapped at a mosquito.

He snapped at a flea.

He snapped at a minnow.

And he snapped at me.


He caught the mosquito.

He caught the flea.

He caught the minnow.

But he didn't catch me.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 52 The Last Stocking from The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus by Amelia C. Houghton The Passing of Nicholas from The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus by Amelia C. Houghton
Santa Claus from The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus by Amelia C. Houghton
The Christmas Tree from The Little Brown Bowl by Phila Butler Bowman The Elves and the Shoemaker from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Around the Fire by Lisa M. Ripperton The Dwarf and the Cobbler's Sons from Tales That Nimko Told by Mary Brecht Pulver The Legend of King Wenceslaus from The Pearl Story Book by Eleanor L. Skinner The Shepherd Maiden's Gift from The Pearl Story Book by Eleanor L. Skinner
The Glad New Year by Mary Mapes Dodge Babouscka by Edith M. Thomas The Willow Man by Juliana Horatia Ewing I Heard a Bird Sing by Oliver Herford While Stars of Christmas Shine by Emilie Poulsson The Frost King by Mary Mapes Dodge
What Can I Give Him? by Christina Georgina Rossetti
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The North Wind and the Sun

The North Wind and the Sun had a quarrel about which of them was the stronger. While they were disputing with much heat and bluster, a Traveler passed along the road wrapped in a cloak.

"Let us agree," said the Sun, "that he is the stronger who can strip that Traveler of his cloak."

"Very well," growled the North Wind, and at once sent a cold, howling blast against the Traveler.


[Illustration]

With the first gust of wind the ends of the cloak whipped about the Traveler's body. But he immediately wrapped it closely around him, and the harder the Wind blew, the tighter he held it to him. The North Wind tore angrily at the cloak, but all his efforts were in vain.

Then the Sun began to shine. At first his beams were gentle, and in the pleasant warmth after the bitter cold of the North Wind, the Traveler unfastened his cloak and let it hang loosely from his shoulders. The Sun's rays grew warmer and warmer. The man took off his cap and mopped his brow. At last he became so heated that he pulled off his cloak, and, to escape the blazing sunshine, threw himself down in the welcome shade of a tree by the roadside.

Gentleness and kind persuasion win where force and bluster fail.


[Illustration]