Third Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for May


The Land of Counterpane

When I was sick and lay a-bed,

I had two pillows at my head,

And all my toys beside me lay,

To keep me happy all the day.


And sometimes for an hour or so

I watched my leaden soldiers go,

With different uniforms and drills,

Among the bed-clothes, through the hills;


And sometimes sent my ships in fleets

All up and down among the sheets;

Or brought my trees and houses out,

And planted cities all about.


I was the giant great and still

That sits upon the pillow-hill,

And sees before him, dale and plain,

The pleasant land of counterpane.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 38 Heidi Gains in One Way and Loses in Another from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Henry III of Winchester—Simon de Montfort from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Two Wonderful Mountain Climbers from The Burgess Animal Book for Children by Thornton Burgess The Wedding of Allan-a-Dale from Stories of Robin Hood Told to the Children by H. E. Marshall The Pilgrim Fathers from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge Clever Manka from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton The Tree That Was Cut Down and Grew Again from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Story of a Great Story from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin The Signs on the Hill from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Benjamin Franklin (Part 2 of 4) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Spendthrift and the Swallow from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter More Labors from Gods and Heroes by Robert Edward Francillon The Ways of Ants from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright Wayfarers All (Part 2 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
De Sheepfol' by Sarah Platt Greene The Fairy by William Blake The Arrow and the Song by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Pebbles by Frank Dempster Sherman Poem by Rachel Field The Windmill by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow I Love You, Mother by Joy Allison
Week 39 A Ghost in the House from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Henry III—The Story of the Poisoned Dagger from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Piggy and Hardshell from The Burgess Animal Book for Children by Thornton Burgess Robin Hood and the Butcher from Stories of Robin Hood Told to the Children by H. E. Marshall Thirty Years of War from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge Susan Walker, What a Talker! from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton The Writing upon the Wall from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The King and the Page from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin The Old Boulder from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Benjamin Franklin (Part 3 of 4) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Cat and the Birds from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter His Eleventh Labor: The Garden of the Hesperides from Gods and Heroes by Robert Edward Francillon Mr. Worm and His Family from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright Wayfarers All (Part 3 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Campbells Are Comin', Anonymous The Cloud by Sara Teasdale The Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt The Lost Doll by Charles Kingsley Poem by Rachel Field SEPTEMBER POEM The Drum by Eugene Field
Week 40 A Summer Evening on the Mountain from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Edward I—The Little War of Chalons from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall The Mammals of the Sea from The Burgess Animal Book for Children by Thornton Burgess Robin Hood and the Bishop from Stories of Robin Hood Told to the Children by H. E. Marshall The Dutch at Sea from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge Aschenputtel from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton Daniel in the Den of Lions from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Hunted King from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin Heath Bells and Berries from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Benjamin Franklin (Part 4 of 4) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Dog and the Oyster from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter His Twelfth Labor: The Descent into Hades from Gods and Heroes by Robert Edward Francillon Mr. Earth-Worm at Home from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright The Further Adventures of Toad (Part 1 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Owl by Alfred Lord Tennyson To Autumn by William Blake The Eagle by Alfred Lord Tennyson The Captain Stood on the Carronade by Frederick Marryat Poem by Rachel Field The Sandpiper by Celia Thaxter October's Party by George Cooper
Week 41 Sunday Bells from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Edward I—The Lawgiver from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall The Ol' Beech Pa'tridge (Part 1 of 2) from Secrets of the Woods by William J. Long Robin Hood and Maid Marian from Stories of Robin Hood Told to the Children by H. E. Marshall The Great South Land from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge Puss in Boots; or, The Master Cat from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton The Story of a Joyous Journey from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
"Try, Try Again!" from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin The Cone Hunt from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Daniel Webster (Part 1 of 5) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Astrologer from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter The Choice of Hercules from Gods and Heroes by Robert Edward Francillon Mr. Worm at Work from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright The Further Adventures of Toad (Part 2 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Hag by Robert Herrick The Clod and the Pebble by William Blake To an Autumn Leaf, Anonymous October's Bright Blue Weather by Helen Hunt Jackson Poem by Rachel Field Sir Patrick Spens, Anonymous Autumn Fires by Robert Louis Stevenson
Week 42 Preparations for a Journey from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Edward I—The Hammer of the Scots from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall The Ol' Beech Pa'tridge (Part 2 of 2) from Secrets of the Woods by William J. Long Robin Hood and the Silver Arrow from Stories of Robin Hood Told to the Children by H. E. Marshall Van Riebeek's Colony from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge Murdoch's Rath from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton Saint Ursula (Part 1 of 2) from In God's Garden by Amy Steedman
Why He Carried the Turkey from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin A Tuft of Evening Primroses from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Daniel Webster (Part 2 of 5) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin Three Bullocks and a Lion from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter The Tunic of Nessus from Gods and Heroes by Robert Edward Francillon Mr. Worm's Cottage by the Sea from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright The Further Adventures of Toad (Part 3 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Cavalier's Escape by Walter Thornbury Eternity by William Blake ---OCTOBER--- The Sands of Dee by Charles Kingsley Poem by Rachel Field Auld Daddy Darkness by James Ferguson Robin Redbreast by William Allingham
Week 43 A Visitor from Heidi by Johanna Spyri The Story of King Robert the Bruce and Bohun from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Following the Deer (Part 1 of 6) from Secrets of the Woods by William J. Long Robin Hood and King Richard from Stories of Robin Hood Told to the Children by H. E. Marshall In the Days of Oliver Cromwell from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge Faithful John, the King's Servant from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton Saint Ursula (Part 2 of 2) from In God's Garden by Amy Steedman
The Paddle-Wheel Boat from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin A Strange Cloak from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Daniel Webster (Part 3 of 5) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin Mercury and the Woodman from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter The Apple of Discord from Gods and Heroes by Robert Edward Francillon Mr. Worm at Home from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright "Like Summer Tempests Came His Tears" (Part 1 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
Lullaby for Titania by William Shakespeare The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake Lord Lovel, Anonymous Friends by L. G. Warner Poem by Rachel Field The Basket-Makers by E. V. Lucas Jack Frost by Gabriel Setoun
Week 44 A Compensation from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Story of the Battle of Bannockburn from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Following the Deer (Part 2 of 6) from Secrets of the Woods by William J. Long The Death of Robin Hood from Stories of Robin Hood Told to the Children by H. E. Marshall Two Famous Admirals from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge The Flax from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton The New Temple on Mount Moriah from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Caliph and the Gardener from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin Sir Talis from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Daniel Webster (Part 4 of 5) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Frog and the Mouse from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter Daedalus and Icarus from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price A Look at a House-Fly from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright "Like Summer Tempests Came His Tears" (Part 2 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
Indian Summer by John Greenleaf Whittier Thoughts by Sara Teasdale Gaelic Lullaby, Anonymous The Frost Spirit by John Greenleaf Whittier Poem by Rachel Field Indian Summer by John Greenleaf Whittier How the Leaves Came Down by Susan Coolidge
Week 45 Winter in Dorfli from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Edward III of Windsor—The Battle of Sluys from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Following the Deer (Part 3 of 6) from Secrets of the Woods by William J. Long The Early Home of Joan from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe De Ruyter from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge Molly Whuppie from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton The Beautiful Queen of Persia (Part 1 of 2) from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Cowherd Who Became a Poet from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin The Vase and the Plume from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Daniel Webster (Part 5 of 5) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Fox and the Crab from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter Diana and Actaeon from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price How To Look at a Fly from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright "Like Summer Tempests Came His Tears" (Part 3 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Splendor Falls by Alfred Lord Tennyson From Auguries of Innocence by William Blake November by Alice Cary ---NOVEMBER--- Sunday from Poems by Rachel Lyman Field The Tiger by William Blake Jack Frost by Hannah Flagg Gould
Week 46 The Winter Continues from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Edward III of Windsor—The Battle of Crecy from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Following the Deer (Part 4 of 6) from Secrets of the Woods by William J. Long The First Call from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The Founder of Pennsylvania from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge How One Turned His Trouble to Some Account from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton The Beautiful Queen of Persia (Part 2 of 2) from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Lover of Men from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin Port of Elm from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Abraham Lincoln (Part 1 of 4) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Serpent and the Eagle from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter Pegasus and Bellerophon from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price Mrs. Fly and Her Foes from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright The Return of Ulysses (Part 1 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
I Live for Those Who Love Me by G. Linnaeus Banks Rain at Night by Sara Teasdale The Pig and the Hen by Alice Cary The Owl by Alfred Lord Tennyson At the Bank from Poems by Rachel Lyman Field Robin Hood and the Ranger, Anonymous Come, Little Leaves by George Cooper
Week 47 News from Distant Friends from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Edward III of Windsor—The Siege of Calais from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Following the Deer (Part 5 of 6) from Secrets of the Woods by William J. Long The Journey to Chinon from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The Pilgrim's Progress from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge Little Freddy with His Fiddle from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton The Scribe Who Wrote the Old Testament from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Charcoal Man and the King from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin Junco from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Abraham Lincoln (Part 2 of 4) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter Phaeton and the Chariot of the Sun from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price Of What Use Are Flies from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright The Return of Ulysses (Part 2 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
Ghost Fairies by Frank Dempster Sherman Stars by Sara Teasdale Don't Give Up by Phœbe Cary The Sandman by Margaret Vandegrift Fog from Poems by Rachel Lyman Field Thanksgiving by Amelia Barr Thanksgiving Day by Lydia Maria Child
Week 48 How Life Went On at Grandfather's from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Edward III of Windsor—The Battle of Poitiers from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Following the Deer (Part 6 of 6) from Secrets of the Woods by William J. Long The Siege of Orleans from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The House of Orange from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge The Wild Swans from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton The Nobleman Who Built the Wall of Jerusalem from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
Which was the King? from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin Little Snowshoes from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Abraham Lincoln (Part 3 of 4) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Bull and the Goat from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter Atalanta and Hippomenes from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price A Swarm of Flies from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright The Return of Ulysses (Part 3 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
Abou Ben Adhem by Leigh Hunt To Winter by William Blake A Canadian Folk-Song by William Wilfred Campbell The First Snowfall by James Russell Lowell The Elf Tree from Poems by Rachel Lyman Field The Inchcape Rock by Robert Southey King Bruce by Eliza Cook
Week 49 Something Unexpected Happens from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Richard II of Bordeaux—Wat Tyler's Rebellion from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Kringle Valley from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Coronation at Rheims from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe Whitefoot Goes Astray from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Awakening of Tuktu from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Great Mill from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess
The Golden Tripod from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin Tuktu and Aklak from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Abraham Lincoln (Part 4 of 4) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin Tuktu's Soft Heart from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Lost in the Fog from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Some Queer Flies from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright The Good Spirit from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess
Why Does It Snow? by Laura E. Richards For Christmas by Rachel Lyman Field Old Winter by Thomas Noel Ceremonies for Christmas by Robert Herrick City Lights from Poems by Rachel Lyman Field While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night by Nahum Tate Christmas Bells by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Week 50 "Good-bye Till We Meet Again" from Heidi by Johanna Spyri How King Richard Lost His Throne from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Tuktu Tells Her Story from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Siege of Paris from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The Deer People from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Wilful Young Deer from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess When the World Was Young from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess
The Chosen Deer from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Tuktu's Happy Thought from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess How It Happened from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller Christmas on the Prairie from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller The Legend of the Christmas Rose from Legends and Stories of Italy by Amy Steedman A Droll Santa Claus from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller How a Bear Brought Christmas from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller
Christmas Song by Eugene Field How Far Is It to Bethlehem? by Frances Chesterton Bundles by John Farrar The Friendly Beasts, Anonymous A Catch by the Hearth from Poems, Anonymous The Unbroken Song by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night by Nahum Tate
Week 51 The First Reindeer from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Henry IV of Bolingbroke—Battle of Shrewsbury from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Tuktu and Aklak Have a Secret from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Capture of the Maid from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The Round-Up from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Christmas Story from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Great Temptation from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess
Christmas under the Snow from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller Little Spot and Tuktu Dream from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Christmas at Greccio: A Story of St. Francis from Christmas in Legend and Story: A Book for Boys and Girls by Elva S. Smith Carol's Good Will from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller Out of an Ash-Barrel from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller How a Toboggan Brought Fortune from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller The Telltale Tile from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller
An Old Christmas Greeting, Anonymous A Christmas Folk-Song by Lizette Woodworth Reese Cradle Hymn by Martin Luther A Visit from St. Nicholas by Clement Clarke Moore Bethlehem of Judea from Poems, Anonymous As I Sat Under a Sycamore Tree, Anonymous As Joseph Was A-Walking, Anonymous
Week 52 Attacked by Wolves from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Story of How Prince Hal Was Sent to Prison from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall The Christmas Invitation from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Martyr Maid of France from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The Christmas Vision from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Wooden Shoes of Little Wolff from Good Stories for Great Holidays by Frances Jenkins Olcott The Golden Cobwebs from How To Tell Stories to Children and Some Stories To Tell by Sara Cone Bryant
The Birds' Christmas Tree from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller How the Horse Told from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller The Cat's Charm from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller May's Happy Thought from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller The Magic Figure from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller Christmas in the Alley from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller The Tailor of Gloucester from The Tailor of Gloucester by Beatrix Potter
Santa Claus and the Mouse by Emilie Poulsson Christmas Carol by Sara Teasdale The Holly by Edith King The New Year by Dinah Mulock The Joy of Giving from Poems by John Greenleaf Whittier The Glad New Year by Mary Mapes Dodge Ring Out, Wild Bells by Alfred Lord Tennyson
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READING-LITERATURE: Third Reader  by Harriette Taylor Treadwell

Ginger

Ginger was a tall chestnut mare with a long, handsome neck. She stood in the stall just beyond mine. The first day I was in my new home she looked across to me and said:

"So it is you who have turned me out of my box; it is a very strange thing for a colt like you to come and turn a lady out of her own home."

"I beg your pardon," I said, "I have turned no one out; the man who brought me put me here, and I had nothing to do with it. As to my being a colt, I am turned four years old and am a grown-up horse. I never had words yet with horse or mare, and it is my wish to live at peace."

"Well," she said, "we shall see. Of course, I do not want to have words with a young thing like you." I said no more.

A few days after this I had to go out with Ginger in the carriage. I wondered how we should get on together; but except laying her ears back when I was led up to her, she behaved very well. She did her work honestly, and did her full share, and I never wish to have a better partner. When we came to a hill she would throw her weight into the collar and pull away. We had the same courage at our work and our master never had to use the whip on either of us. Then our paces were much the same, and I found it easy to keep step with her when trotting. After we had been out two or three times together we grew quite friendly, which made me feel very much at home.

One day when Ginger and I were standing alone in the shade she wanted to know all about my bringing up and breaking in, and I told her.

"Well," said she, "if I had had your bringing up, I might have had as good a temper as you, but now I don't believe I ever shall."

"Why not?" I said.

"Because it has been all so different with me," she replied. "I never had any one, horse or man, that was kind to me, or that I cared to please. In the first place I was taken from my mother as soon as I was weaned, and put with a lot of other young colts. None of them cared for me, and I cared for none of them.

"There was no kind master like yours to look after me, and talk to me, and bring me nice things to eat. The man that had the care of us never gave me a kind word in my life. I do not mean that he ill-used me, but he did not care for us one bit further than to see that we had plenty to eat, and shelter in the winter.

"A footpath ran through our field, and very often the boys passing through would fling stones to make us gallop. I was never hit, but one fine young colt was badly cut in the face, and he was scarred for life. We did not care for them, but of course it made us more wild, and we felt that boys were our enemies.

"We had fun in the meadows, galloping up and down and chasing each other round and round the field; then standing still under the shade of the trees. But when it came to 'breaking in,' that was a bad time for me. Several men came to catch me, and when at last they closed me in at one corner of the field, one caught me by the forelock. Another caught me by the nose and held it so tight I could hardly draw my breath. Then another took my under jaw in his hard hand and wrenched my mouth open, and so they got the halter on and the bit into my mouth. Then one dragged me along by the halter, another flogging behind.

"They did not give me a chance to know what they wanted. I was high-bred and had a great deal of spirit. I was very wild, and gave them plenty of trouble; but it was dreadful to be shut up in a stall day after day, and I fretted and pined and wanted to get loose.

"My old master could have done anything with me, but he had given up all the hard part of the work to his son and he came only at times to oversee. His son was a strong, tall, bold man; they called him Samson, and he used to boast that he had never found a horse that could throw him. There was no gentleness in him, as there was in his father, but only hardness, a hard voice, a hard eye, a hard hand. I felt from the first that he wanted to wear all the spirit out of me, and just make me into a quiet, obedient piece of horseflesh. 'Horseflesh!' Yes, that is all that he thought about." And Ginger stamped her foot as if the very thought of him made her angry. Then she went on:

"If I did not do exactly what he wanted he would make me run round the training field till he had tired me out. One day he had worked me hard, and when I lay down I was tired and angry, and it all seemed so hard.

"The next morning he came for me early, and ran me round again for a long time. I had scarcely had an hour's rest when he came again for me with a saddle and bridle and a new kind of bit. He had just mounted me when something I did put him out of temper, and he chucked me hard with the rein.

"The new bit was very painful, and I reared up suddenly, which angered him still more, and he began to flog me. I felt my whole spirit set against him, and I began to kick, and plunge, and rear, as I had never done before, and we had a regular fight. For a long time he stuck to the saddle and punished me cruelly with his whip and spurs. My blood was up, and I cared for nothing he could do if I could only get him off.

"At last after a hard struggle I threw him off backward. I heard him fall heavily on the turf, and without looking behind me I galloped off to the other end of the field. There I turned round and saw him slowly rising and going into the stable. I stood under an oak tree and watched, but no one came to catch me.

"Time went on and the sun was very hot. The flies swarmed round me and settled on my bleeding flanks where the spurs had dug in. I felt hungry, for I had not eaten since the early morning, but there was not enough grass in that meadow for a goose to live on. I wanted to lie down and rest, but with the saddle strapped on there was no comfort, and there was not a drop of water to drink. The afternoon wore on, and the sun got low. I saw the other colts led in, and I knew they were having a good feed.

"At last, just as the sun went down, I saw my old master come out with a sieve in his hand. He was a fine old gentleman with white hair, but his voice was what I should know him by among a thousand. It was not high, nor yet low, but full and clear and kind, and when he gave orders it was so steady and decided every one knew, both horses and men, that he must be obeyed.

"He came quietly along, now and then shaking the oats he had in the sieve, and speaking cheerfully and gently to me: 'Come along, lassie, come along, lassie; come along.' I stood still and let him come up; he held the oats to me, and I began to eat without fear; his voice took all my fear away. He stood by, patting and stroking me while I was eating.

"When he saw the clots of blood on my side he seemed much vexed. 'Poor lassie! it was a bad business, a bad business.' Then he quietly took the rein and led me to the stable. Just at the door stood Samson. I laid my ears back and snapped at him. 'Stand back,' said the master, 'and keep out of her way; you've done a bad day's work for this filly.' He growled out something about an ugly brute. 'Hark ye,' said the father, 'a bad-tempered man will never make a good-tempered horse. You've not learned your trade yet, Samson.'

"Then he led me into my box, took off the saddle and bridle with his own hands and tied me up. He called for a pail of warm water and a sponge, took off his coat, and sponged my sides a good while, so tenderly that I was sure he knew how sore and bruised they were. 'Whoa! my pretty one,' he said, 'stand still, stand still.' Even his voice did me good, and the bathing was very comfortable.

"The skin was so broken at the corners of my mouth that I could not eat the hay. He looked closely at it, shook his head, and told the man to make a good bran mash and put some meal into it. How good that mash was! and so soft and healing to my mouth. He stood by all the time I was eating, stroking me and talking to the man. 'If a fine horse like this,' said he, 'cannot be broken by fair means, she will never be good for anything.'

"After that he often came to see me, and when my mouth was healed the other breaker went on training me; he was steady and thoughtful, and I soon learned what he wanted."

The next time that Ginger and I were together in the paddock she told me about her first place.

"After my breaking in," she said, "I was bought by a dealer to match another chestnut horse, sent up to London. I had been driven with a check-rein, and I hated it worse than anything else. But in this place we were reined far tighter, the coachman and his master thinking we looked more stylish so.

"I like to toss my head about and hold it as high as any horse. But it was cruel to be obliged to hold it high for hours. Besides that, I had to have two bits instead of one. They hurt my tongue and my jaw. It was worst when we had to stand by the hour waiting for our mistress at some grand party. If I fretted or stamped the whip was laid on. It was enough to drive one mad."

"Did not your master take any thought for you?" I said.

"No," said she, "he cared only to have a stylish turnout; I think he knew very little about horses. He left that to his coachman, who told him I had a bad temper. I was willing to work, and ready to work hard, too, but not to be tormented for nothing. What right had they to make me suffer like that? Besides the soreness in my mouth, and the pain in my neck, it made my windpipe feel bad. If I had stopped there long I know it would have spoiled my breathing.

"I grew more and more restless and fretful. I could not help it, and I began to snap and kick when any one came to harness me. For this the groom beat me, and one day, as they had just buckled us into the carriage and were straining my head up with that rein, I began to plunge and kick with all my might. I soon broke a lot of harness, and kicked myself clear; so that was an end of that place.

"After this I was again sold. My new master tried me in all kinds of ways and with different bits, and he soon found out what I could not bear. At last he drove me without a check-rein, and then sold me, as a quiet horse to a gentleman in the country. He was a good master, and I was getting on very well, but his old groom left him and a new one came.

"The new groom was as hard-tempered and hard-handed as Samson. He always spoke in a harsh voice. If I did not move in the stall the moment he wanted me, he hit me with his stable broom or fork. Everything he did was rough, and I began to hate him. He wanted to make me afraid of him, but I was too high-mettled for that.

"One day, when he had mistreated me more than usual, I bit him, and he began to hit me about the head with a riding whip. After that he never dared to come into my stall again. Either my heels or my teeth were ready for him, and he knew it. My master listened to what the man said, and so I was sold again.

"The same dealer heard of me, and said he thought he knew one place where I would do well. 'It was a pity,' he said, 'that such a fine horse should go to the bad for want of a good chance,' and the end of it was that I came here not long before you did. But I had made up my mind that men were my enemies and that I must defend myself. I wish I could think about things as you do; but I can't, after all I have gone through."

I was sorry for Ginger, but I thought she had made the worst of it. However, I found as the weeks went on, she grew more gentle and cheerful. She lost that watchful, hard look.

One day the groom said, "I do believe that mare is getting fond of me, she whinnied this morning when I had been rubbing her forehead."

Master saw the change, too, and one day when he got out of the carriage and came to speak to us he stroked her beautiful neck. "Well, my pretty one, how do things go with you now? You are much happier than when you came to us, I think."

She put her nose up to him in a friendly, trustful way, while he rubbed it gently.

"We shall make a cure of her," he said.

"Yes, sir; she's wonderfully improved," said the groom, "she's not the same creature that she was. She will be as good as Black Beauty by and by. Kindness is all she needs, poor thing. One pound of patience and gentleness, firmness and petting, mixed with half a pint of common sense, and given to the horse every day, will cure almost any vicious animal."

Adapted from "Black Beauty," by Anna Sewell