First Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for April

If All the World Were Paper



The Little Cock Sparrow



Ye Song of Sixpence



My Lady's Garden






Time To Rise

A birdie with a yellow bill

Hopped upon my window sill,

Cocked his shining eye and said:

"Ain't you 'shamed, you sleepy-head!"


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 10 My Father Finds the Dragon from My Father's Dragon by Ruth Stiles Gannett Franklin and the Kite from Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans by Edward Eggleston The Stickleback Father from Among the Pond People by Clara Dillingham Pierson The Lad Who Went to the North Wind from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Around the Fire by Lisa M. Ripperton Conquerors of the Sea from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge The Pass (Part 3 of 3) from The Swiss Twins by Lucy Fitch Perkins The Angel by the Well from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
Time To Rise by Robert Louis Stevenson
Independence by A. A. Milne
How the Little Kite Learned to Fly, Anonymous
The Dumb Soldier by Robert Louis Stevenson The Weather, Anonymous The Wind by Robert Louis Stevenson A Chill by Christina Georgina Rossetti
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Fox and the Grapes

A Fox one day spied a beautiful bunch of ripe grapes hanging from a vine trained along the branches of a tree. The grapes seemed ready to burst with juice, and the Fox's mouth watered as he gazed longingly at them.


[Illustration]

The bunch hung from a high branch, and the Fox had to jump for it, The first time he jumped he missed it by a long way. So he walked off a short distance and took a running leap at it, only to fall short once more. Again and again he tried, but in vain.

Now he sat down and looked at the grapes in disgust.

"What a fool I am," he said. "Here I am wearing myself out to get a bunch of sour grapes that are not worth gaping for."

And off he walked very, very scornfully.

There are many who pretend to despise and belittle that which is beyond their reach.