First Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for April

If All the World Were Paper



The Little Cock Sparrow



Ye Song of Sixpence



My Lady's Garden




My Shadow

I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me,

And what can be the use of him is more than I can see.

He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head;

And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed.


The funniest thing about him is the way he likes to grow—

Not at all like proper children, which is always very slow;

For he sometimes shoots up taller like an india-rubber ball,

And he sometimes gets so little that there's none of him at all.


He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to play,

And can only make a fool of me in every sort of way.

He stays so close beside me, he's a coward, you can see;

I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow sticks to me!


One morning, very early, before the sun was up,

I rose and found the shining dew on every buttercup;

But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-head,

Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed.



  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 14 A Message from Africa from The Story of Doctor Dolittle by Hugh Lofting Putnam and the Wolf from Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans by Edward Eggleston The Slow Little Mud Turtle from Among the Pond People by Clara Dillingham Pierson The Magic Fiddle from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Up the Stairs by Lisa M. Ripperton The Story of Carthage from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge The Rain and the Rice-Planting from The Filipino Twins by Lucy Fitch Perkins A Midnight Wrestling Match from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
Nursery Song by Mrs. Carter
Water-Lilies by A. A. Milne
Sir Robin by Lucy Larcom
Foreign Children by Robert Louis Stevenson April by J. B. Gustafson The Wind by Robert Louis Stevenson Consider by Christina Georgina Rossetti
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Old Lion and the Fox

An old Lion, whose teeth and claws were so worn that it was not so easy for him to get food as in his younger days, pretended that he was sick. He took care to let all his neighbors know about it, and then lay down in his cave to wait for visitors. And when they came to offer him their sympathy, he ate them up one by one.

The Fox came too, but he was very cautious about it. Standing at a safe distance from the cave, he inquired politely after the Lion's health. The Lion replied that he was very ill indeed, and asked the Fox to step in for a moment. But Master Fox very wisely stayed outside, thanking the Lion very kindly for the invitation.

"I should be glad to do as you ask," he added, "but I have noticed that there are many foot prints leading into your cave and none coming out. Pray tell me, how do your visitors find their way out again?"

Take warning from the misfortunes of others.


[Illustration]