First Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for July

Over the Hills and Far Away



Bo-Peep



Buy a Broom



Lucy Locket




The Months

January brings the snow,

Makes our feet and fingers glow.


February brings the rain,

Thaws the frozen lake again.


March brings breezes loud and shrill,

Tp stir the dancing daffodil.


April brings the primrose sweet,

Scatters daises at our feet.


May brings flocks of pretty lambs,

Skipping by their fleecy damns.


June brings tulips, lilies, roses,

Fills the children's hands with posies.


Hot July brings cooling showers,

Apricots and gillyflowers.


August brings the sheaves of corn,

Then the harvest home is borne.


Warm September brings the fruit,

Sportsmen then begin to shoot.


Fresh October brings the pheasent,

Then to gather nuts is pleasent.


Dull November brings the blast,

Then the leaves are whirling fast.


Chill December brings the sleet,

Blazing fire, and Christmas treat.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 26 The Rock from The Story of Doctor Dolittle by Hugh Lofting A Long Journey from Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans by Edward Eggleston Melons and Their Cousins from Seed-Babies by Margaret Warner Morley Hafiz, the Stone-Cutter from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Around the Fire by Lisa M. Ripperton King Ahasuerus from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge How They Went to the Bog from The Irish Twins by Lucy Fitch Perkins
The Bog from The Irish Twins by Lucy Fitch Perkins
How Aaron Made a Golden Calf and What Became of It from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
God's Care, Anonymous
At Home by A. A. Milne
Who Likes the Rain? by Clara Doty Bates
Singing Time by Robert Louis Stevenson Up in the Morning Early, Anonymous The Golden Rule, Anonymous Lady of All Beauty by Christina Georgina Rossetti
First row Previous row         


Uncle Remus—His Songs and His Sayings  by Joel Chandler Harris

The Wonderful Tar-Baby Story

"D IDN'T the fox never catch the rabbit, Uncle Remus?" asked the little boy the next evening.

"He come mighty nigh it, honey, sho's you born—Brer Fox did. One day atter Brer Rabbit fool 'im wid dat calamus root, Brer Fox went ter wuk en got 'im some tar, en mix it wid some turkentime, en fix up a contrapshun w'at he call a Tar-Baby, en he tuck dish yer Tar-Baby en he sot 'er in de big road, en den he lay off in de bushes fer to see what de news wuz gwine ter be. En he didn't hatter wait long, nudder, kaze bimeby here come Brer Rabbit pacin' down de road—lippity-clippity, clippity-lippity—dez ez sassy ez a jay-bird. Brer Fox, he lay low. Brer Rabbit come prancin' 'long twel he spy de Tar-Baby, en den he fotch up on his behime legs like he wuz 'stonished. De Tar Baby, she sot dar, she did, en Brer Fox, he lay low.

" 'Mawnin'!' sez Brer Rabbit, sezee—'nice wedder dis mawnin',' sezee.

"Tar-Baby ain't sayin' nuthin', en Brer Fox he lay low.

" 'How duz yo' sym'tums seem ter segashuate?' sez Brer Rabbit, sezee.

"Brer Fox, he wink his eye slow, en lay low, en de Tar-Baby, she ain't sayin' nuthin'.

" 'How you come on, den? Is you deaf?' sez Brer Rabbit, sezee. 'Kaze if you is, I kin holler louder,' sezee.

"Tar-Baby stay still, en Brer Fox, he lay low.

" 'You er stuck up, dat's w'at you is,' says Brer Rabbit, sezee, 'en I'm gwine ter kyore you, dat's w'at I'm a gwine ter do,' sezee.

"Brer Fox, he sorter chuckle in his stummick, he did, but Tar-Baby ain't sayin' nothin'.

" 'I'm gwine ter larn you how ter talk ter 'spectubble folks ef hit's de las' ack,' sez Brer Rabbit, sezee. 'Ef you don't take off dat hat en tell me howdy, I'm gwine ter bus' you wide open,' sezee.

"Tar-Baby stay still, en Brer Fox, he lay low.

"Brer Rabbit keep on axin' 'im, en de Tar-Baby, she keep on sayin' nothin', twel present'y Brer Rabbit draw back wid his fis', he did, en blip he tuck 'er side er de head. Right dar's whar he broke his merlasses jug. His fis' stuck, en he can't pull loose. De tar hilt 'im. But Tar-Baby, she stay still, en Brer Fox, he lay low.

" 'Ef you don't lemme loose, I'll knock you agin,' sez Brer Rabbit, sezee, en wid dat he fotch 'er a wipe wid de udder han', en dat stuck. Tar-Baby, she ain't sayin' nuthin', en Brer Fox, he lay low.

" 'Tu'n me loose, fo' I kick de natchul stuffin' outen you,' sez Brer Rabbit, sezee, but de Tar-Baby, she ain't sayin' nuthin'. She des hilt on, en de Brer Rabbit lose de use er his feet in de same way. Brer Fox, he lay low. Den Brer Rabbit squall out dat ef de Tar-Baby don't tu'n 'im loose he butt 'er cranksided. En den he butted, en his head got stuck. Den Brer Fox, he sa'ntered fort', lookin' dez ez innercent ez wunner yo' mammy's mockin'-birds.

" 'Howdy, Brer Rabbit,' sez Brer Fox, sezee. 'You look sorter stuck up dis mawnin',' sezee, en den he rolled on de groun', en laft en laft twel he couldn't laff no mo'. 'I speck you'll take dinner wid me dis time, Brer Rabbit. I done laid in some calamus root, en I ain't gwineter take no skuse,' sez Brer Fox, sezee."

Here Uncle Remus paused, and drew a two-pound yam out of the ashes.

"Did the fox eat the rabbit?" asked the little boy to whom the story had been told.

"Dat's all de fur de tale goes," replied the old man. "He mout, an den agin he moutent. Some say Judge B'ar come 'long en loosed 'im—some say he didn't. I hear Miss Sally callin'. You better run 'long."