First Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for September

Dickory Dock



London Bridge



Puss at Court



Ye Frog's Wooing




Wynken, Blynken, and Nod

Wynken, Blynken, and Nod one night

Sailed off in a wooden shoe—

Sailed on a river of crystal light,

Into a sea of dew.

"Where are you going, and what do you wish?"

The old moon asked the three.

"We have come to fish for the herring-fish

That live in this beautiful sea;

Nets of silver and gold have we!"

Said Wynken,

Blynken,

And Nod.


The old moon laughed and sang a song,

As they rocked in the wooden shoe,

And the wind that sped them all night long

Ruffled the waves of dew.

The little stars were the herring-fish

That lived in the beautiful sea—

"Now cast your nets wherever you wish,—

Never afeard are we!"

So cried the stars to the fishermen three:

Wynken,

Blynken,

And Nod.


All night long their nets they threw

To the stars in the twinkling foam,—

Then down from the skies came the wooden shoe,

Bringing the fishermen home;

'Twas all so pretty a sail, it seemed

As if it could not be,

And some folks thought 'twas a dream they'd dreamed

Of sailing that beautiful sea—

But I shall name you the fishermen three:

Wynken,

Blynken,

And Nod.


Wynken and Blynken are two little eyes,

And Nod is a little head,

And the wooden shoe that sailed the skies

Is a wee one's trundle-bed.

So shut your eyes while Mother sings

Of wonderful sights that be,

And you shall see the beautiful things

As you rock in the misty sea,

Where the old shoe rocked the fishermen three—

Wynken,

Blynken,

And Nod.



  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 36 The Queen of the Field Mice from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum Some Boys Who Became Authors from Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans by Edward Eggleston Cradles from Seed-Babies by Margaret Warner Morley The Five Remarkable Brothers from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Around the Fire by Lisa M. Ripperton Coriolanus from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge Twenty Years After from The Irish Twins by Lucy Fitch Perkins What Strong Drink Brought to Aaron's Sons from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
Bow-Wow-Wow, Anonymous
The Invaders by A. A. Milne
Elf and Dormouse by Oliver Herford
Keepsake Mill by Robert Louis Stevenson Thank You, Pretty Cow by Jane Taylor Holding Hands by Lenore M. Link Fly Away by Christina Georgina Rossetti
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Fox and the Grapes

A Fox one day spied a beautiful bunch of ripe grapes hanging from a vine trained along the branches of a tree. The grapes seemed ready to burst with juice, and the Fox's mouth watered as he gazed longingly at them.


[Illustration]

The bunch hung from a high branch, and the Fox had to jump for it, The first time he jumped he missed it by a long way. So he walked off a short distance and took a running leap at it, only to fall short once more. Again and again he tried, but in vain.

Now he sat down and looked at the grapes in disgust.

"What a fool I am," he said. "Here I am wearing myself out to get a bunch of sour grapes that are not worth gaping for."

And off he walked very, very scornfully.

There are many who pretend to despise and belittle that which is beyond their reach.