First Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for January

I Saw Three Ships



The Mulberry Bush



The North Wind and the Robin



Dance a Baby






Elf and Dormouse

Under a toadstool

Crept a wee Elf,

Out of the rain

To shelter himself.


Under the toadstool,

Sound asleep,

Sat a big Dormouse

All in a heap.


Trembled the wee Elf

Frightened, and yet

Fearing to fly away

Lest he get wet.


To the next shelter

Maybe a mile

Sudden the wee Elf

Smiled a wee smile.


Tugged till the toadstool

Toppled in two

Holding it over him

Gayly he flew.


Soon he was safe home,

Dry as could be.

Soon woke the Dormouse

"Good gracious me!


Where is my toadstool!"

Loud he lamented,

And that's how umbrellas

First were invented.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 48 The Good Witch Grants Dorothy's Wish from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
Home Again from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
The Author of "Little Women" from Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans by Edward Eggleston The Oxen Talk with the Calves from Among the Farmyard People by Clara Dillingham Pierson The Old Woman Who Lived in a Vinegar Bottle from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Up the Stairs by Lisa M. Ripperton The Triumph of Rome from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge The Secret Meeting (Part 2 of 2) from The Mexican Twins by Lucy Fitch Perkins Saint Nicholas (Part 1 of 2) from In God's Garden by Amy Steedman
The North Wind Doth Blow, Anonymous
At the Zoo by A. A. Milne
I Love You, Mother by Joy Allison
Requiem by Robert Louis Stevenson I Love Little Pussy by Jane Taylor Norse Lullaby by Eugene Field Peacock's Eyes by Christina Georgina Rossetti
First row Previous row          Next row Last row
The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Dog, the Cock, and the Fox

A Dog and a Cock, who were the best of friends, wished very much to see something of the world. So they decided to leave the farmyard and to set out into the world along the road that led to the woods. The two comrades traveled along in the very best of spirits and without meeting any adventure to speak of.

At nightfall the Cock, looking for a place to roost, as was his custom, spied nearby a hollow tree that he thought would do very nicely for a night's lodging. The Dog could creep inside and the Cock would fly up on one of the branches. So said, so done, and both slept very comfortably.

With the first glimmer of dawn the Cock awoke. For the moment he forgot just where he was. He thought he was still in the farmyard where it had been his duty to arouse the household at daybreak. So standing on tip-toes he flapped his wings and crowed lustily. But instead of awakening the farmer, he awakened a Fox not far off in the wood. The Fox immediately had rosy visions of a very delicious breakfast. Hurrying to the tree where the Cock was roosting, he said very politely:

"A hearty welcome to our woods, honored sir. I cannot tell you how glad I am to see you here. I am quite sure we shall become the closest of friends."


[Illustration]

"I feel highly flattered, kind sir," replied the Cock slyly. "If you will please go around to the door of my house at the foot of the tree, my porter will let you in."

The hungry but unsuspecting Fox, went around the tree as he was told, and in a twinkling the Dog had seized him.

Those who try to deceive may expect to be paid in their own coin.