Third Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for December




Elf and Dormouse

Under a toadstool

Crept a wee Elf,

Out of the rain

To shelter himself.


Under the toadstool,

Sound asleep,

Sat a big Dormouse

All in a heap.


Trembled the wee Elf

Frightened, and yet

Fearing to fly away

Lest he get wet.


To the next shelter

Maybe a mile

Sudden the wee Elf

Smiled a wee smile.


Tugged till the toadstool

Toppled in two

Holding it over him

Gayly he flew.


Soon he was safe home,

Dry as could be.

Soon woke the Dormouse

"Good gracious me!


Where is my toadstool!"

Loud he lamented,

And that's how umbrellas

First were invented.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 47 News from Distant Friends from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Edward III of Windsor—The Siege of Calais from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Following the Deer (Part 5 of 6) from Secrets of the Woods by William J. Long The Journey to Chinon from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The Pilgrim's Progress from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge Little Freddy with His Fiddle from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton The Scribe Who Wrote the Old Testament from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Charcoal Man and the King from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin Junco from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Abraham Lincoln (Part 2 of 4) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter Phaeton and the Chariot of the Sun from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price Of What Use Are Flies from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright The Return of Ulysses (Part 2 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
Ghost Fairies by Frank Dempster Sherman Stars by Sara Teasdale Don't Give Up by Phœbe Cary The Sandman by Margaret Vandegrift Fog from Poems by Rachel Lyman Field Thanksgiving by Amelia Barr Thanksgiving Day by Lydia Maria Child
Week 48 How Life Went On at Grandfather's from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Edward III of Windsor—The Battle of Poitiers from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Following the Deer (Part 6 of 6) from Secrets of the Woods by William J. Long The Siege of Orleans from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The House of Orange from The Awakening of Europe by M. B. Synge The Wild Swans from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Aboard the Ship by Lisa M. Ripperton The Nobleman Who Built the Wall of Jerusalem from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
Which was the King? from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin Little Snowshoes from Holiday Hill by Edith M. Patch Abraham Lincoln (Part 3 of 4) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin The Bull and the Goat from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter Atalanta and Hippomenes from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price A Swarm of Flies from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright The Return of Ulysses (Part 3 of 3) from The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
Abou Ben Adhem by Leigh Hunt To Winter by William Blake A Canadian Folk-Song by William Wilfred Campbell The First Snowfall by James Russell Lowell The Elf Tree from Poems by Rachel Lyman Field The Inchcape Rock by Robert Southey King Bruce by Eliza Cook
Week 49 Something Unexpected Happens from Heidi by Johanna Spyri Richard II of Bordeaux—Wat Tyler's Rebellion from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Kringle Valley from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Coronation at Rheims from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe Whitefoot Goes Astray from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Awakening of Tuktu from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Great Mill from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess
The Golden Tripod from Fifty Famous People by James Baldwin Tuktu and Aklak from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Abraham Lincoln (Part 4 of 4) from Four Great Americans by James Baldwin Tuktu's Soft Heart from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Lost in the Fog from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Some Queer Flies from Seaside and Wayside, Book Two by Julia McNair Wright The Good Spirit from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess
Seasonal Poem Seasonal Poem Old Winter by Thomas Noel Ceremonies for Christmas by Robert Herrick City Lights from Poems by Rachel Lyman Field While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night by Nahum Tate Christmas Bells by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Week 50 "Good-bye Till We Meet Again" from Heidi by Johanna Spyri How King Richard Lost His Throne from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Tuktu Tells Her Story from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Siege of Paris from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The Deer People from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Wilful Young Deer from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess When the World Was Young from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess
The Chosen Deer from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Tuktu's Happy Thought from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess How It Happened from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller Christmas on the Prairie from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller Seasonal Story A Droll Santa Claus from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller How a Bear Brought Christmas from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller
Christmas Song by Eugene Field How Far Is It to Bethlehem? by Frances Chesterton O Little Town of Bethlehem! by Phillips Brooks Seasonal Poem Seasonal Poem The Unbroken Song by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night by Nahum Tate
Week 51 The First Reindeer from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Henry IV of Bolingbroke—Battle of Shrewsbury from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall Tuktu and Aklak Have a Secret from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Capture of the Maid from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The Round-Up from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Christmas Story from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Great Temptation from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess
Christmas under the Snow from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller Little Spot and Tuktu Dream from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Seasonal Story Carol's Good Will from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller Out of an Ash-Barrel from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller How a Toboggan Brought Fortune from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller The Telltale Tile from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller
An Old Christmas Greeting, Anonymous A Christmas Folk-Song by Lizette Woodworth Reese Cradle Hymn by Martin Luther A Visit from St. Nicholas by Clement Clarke Moore For Christmas from Poems by Rachel Lyman Field A Visit from St. Nicholas by Clement Clarke Moore As Joseph Was A-Walking, Anonymous
Week 52 Attacked by Wolves from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Story of How Prince Hal Was Sent to Prison from Our Island Story by H. E. Marshall The Christmas Invitation from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess The Martyr Maid of France from The Beautiful Story of Joan of Arc by Viola Ruth Lowe The Christmas Vision from The Christmas Reindeer by Thornton W. Burgess Seasonal Story Seasonal Story
The Birds' Christmas Tree from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller How the Horse Told from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller The Cat's Charm from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller May's Happy Thought from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller The Magic Figure from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller Christmas in the Alley from Kristy's Christmas Surprise by Olive Thorne Miller Seasonal Story
Seasonal Poem Christmas Carol by Sara Teasdale Seasonal Poem Seasonal Poem The Joy of Giving from Poems by John Greenleaf Whittier O Little Town of Bethlehem! by Phillips Brooks Ring Out, Wild Bells by Alfred Lord Tennyson
Week 53              
             
             
Week 54              
             
             
Week 55              
             
             
Week 56              
             
             
Week 57              
             
             
Week 58              
             
             
Week 59              
             
             
Week 60              
             
             
Week 61              
             
             
Week 62              
             
             
Week 63              
             
             
Week 64              
             
             
Week 65              
             
             
Week 66              
             
             
Week 67              
             
             
Week 68              
             
             
Week 69              
             
             
Week 70              
             
             
Week 71              
             
             
Week 72              
             
             
Week 73              
             
             
Week 74              
             
             
Week 75              
             
             
Week 76              
             
             
Week 77              
             
             
Week 78              
             
             
Week 79              
             
             
Week 80              
             
             
Week 81              
             
             
Week 82              
             
             
Week 83              
             
             
Week 84              
             
             
Week 85              
             
             
Week 86              
             
             
Week 87              
             
             
Week 88              
             
             
Week 89              
             
             
Week 90              
             
             
Week 91              
             
             
Week 92              
             
             
Week 93              
             
             
Week 94              
             
             
Week 95              
             
             
Week 96              
             
             
Week 97              
             
             
Week 98              
             
             
First row Previous row          Next row Last row
READING-LITERATURE: Third Reader  by Harriette Taylor Treadwell

The Bear and the Fox

It was in the spring. The trees were clothed in green and the earth was covered with flowers. It was then that the lion, the king of beasts, called his court together.

Soon all the beasts, both great and small, came in great numbers. Only Reynard the fox was absent. He knew that he was guilty of many misdeeds against the other beasts. He knew that if he came to court he put his life in danger.

The king heard the complaints of the wolf, the hound, and the cock against the fox. He decided that Reynard should appear before the court to answer the complaints. Then he said to Bruin the bear, "You shall take this message to Reynard. But remember, Bruin, that Reynard knows how to flatter even the wisest."

"Let me alone with Reynard," said Bruin; "if he mocks me I shall pay him back."

So the next morning Bruin set out. When he came to Reynard's castle the gate was shut. He knocked and knocked. Then he shouted, "Sir Reynard, are you at home? I am Bruin, your kinsman, with a message from the king. You are summoned to appear at court to answer for your misdeeds. The king has taken a vow that if you fail to appear it shall cost you your life. So take the advice of a friend and come with me."

Reynard was lying near the gate basking in the sun. He lay quiet and listened to the bear. He made sure that Bruin was alone. Then he went into one of his holes. There he thought out what to do to disgrace Bruin and escape going to court.

At last he came forth and said, "Dear Uncle Bruin, how tired you must be. Come in and rest. The king should not have sent you on this long journey; you who are next to him in royal blood and riches. I am going to court to-morrow. I was not well enough to go to-day. I have been eating such strange new meat and it has made me ill."

"What is this strange meat?" asked Bruin.

"Uncle," replied the fox, "why do you care to know? It was only honeycomb. It was simple and mean. I was hungry and I ate too much."

"Do you call honeycomb simple and mean?" cried Bruin. "Come, my dear Reynard, and help me to some of this honey, and I will be your friend as long as I live."

"You are jesting with me," said Reynard.

"I am in earnest," cried Bruin. "For one lick of that honeycomb I will be your friend forever and I will stop the mouths of your enemies."

"If that is true, I can serve you," said the fox. "At the foot of this mountain lives a farmer, who has more honey than you could eat in seven years. I will take you to it."

The bear gave him many thanks and away they went. At last they came to an oak tree in which the farmer had driven a wedge.

"Dear Uncle," said Reynard, "in this tree there is more honey than you can eat. Put your nose inside this gap and you will find it. Do not eat too much. It might do you harm."

"Do not fear for me," said the bear.

Then he put his front paws into the gap and thrust his head in up to his ears.

When the fox saw this he ran and pulled the wedge out and left Bruin locked in the tree. The bear began to howl and to scratch with his hind feet. He made such a noise that the farmer heard it and ran out to see what was the matter.

And the fox from afar off cried, "Is the honey good, Uncle? Do not eat too much."

When the farmer saw the bear he called to his neighbors to come and see. Men, women, and children came running out, some with one weapon and some with another.

Poor Bruin, hearing all this noise, pulled and pulled till he had pulled himself free; but he left his ears behind and the skin of his forepaws. Then he made a leap to get away and fell into the river.

Meanwhile the fox was feeling gay. "All is well," he said, "my enemy is dead and I shall not have to go to court." So he stole a fat hen and started home. When he came to the river he saw the bear resting on the bank. He was filled with fear, but he said, "Well, Uncle, did you eat all the honey? It has made you sick. Where are your ears and your gloves?"

Filled with rage, the bear crept to the water. He plunged in and swam down the stream. When he came to a flat bank he landed and lay there, sick and sore. Then he said to himself, "How can I get back to court? I cannot walk, yet to the court I must go, for Reynard shall pay for this."

So he set his tail on the ground and tumbled his body over and over. After many days he tumbled into court.

"Who can this strange creature be?" they all cried.

But when the king saw him he said, "It is Bruin; who could have wounded him like this?"

"O king," said Bruin, "it was that false Reynard who has brought me to disgrace."

"How dare he do this?" said the king. "I swear now that I shall make him tremble." Whereupon the king sent for his council.

It was decided that Reynard should again be summoned to court. He must be made to answer for all his wrong doing. So Tibert the cat was chosen to get Reynard, for the cat was known for his great wisdom.

Reynard the Fox