Kindergarten Read Aloud Banquet



Nursery Songs for July

Over the Hills and Far Away



Bo-Peep



Buy a Broom



Lucy Locket




A Child's Garden of Verses

The Sun Travels

The sun is not a-bed, when I

At night upon my pillow lie;

Still round the earth his way he takes,

And morning after morning makes.


While here at home, in shining day,

We round the sunny garden play,

Each little Indian sleepy-head

Is being kissed and put to bed.


And when at eve I rise from tea,

Day dawns beyond the Atlantic Sea;

And all the children in the west

Are getting up and being dressed.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 30 Johnny Chuck Turns Tramp Blackberry-Picking
Bobby Nimble-Toes
Appley Dapply's Nursery Rhymes The Dignified Walking-Sticks What Harriet Did on Wednesday The Shingle and Clapboard Story Parables, or Stories
Pairs or Pears Old Woman under the Hill Belleisle Mistress Mary Old King Cole Old King Cole See, See
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Old Old Tales Retold  by Frederick Richardson
[Illustration]

dropcap image ONG ago there lived a pig who had three little pigs. The mother pig was very poor, and at last she had to send her little pigs out to seek their fortunes.




[Illustration]

The first little pig that went away met a man with a bundle of straw, and he said to him, "Please, man, give me that straw to build me a house."


[Illustration]

The man gave the straw to the little pig. Then the pig built a house of the straw, and lived in the house.

By and by a wolf came along and knocked at the door of the little straw house.


[Illustration]

"Little pig, little pig, let me come in!" called the wolf.

"No, no, by the hair of my chinny, chin, chin, I'll not let you in," answered the pig.

"Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house in," said the wolf.

So he huffed and he puffed and he blew the house in. Then he chased the little pig away.


[Illustration]

The second little pig that went away met a man with a bundle of sticks, and he said to the man, "Please, man, give me your bundle of sticks to build me a house."

The man gave the sticks to the little pig. Then the pig built a house of the sticks, and lived in the house.

By and by the wolf came along and knocked at the door of the little house of sticks.

"Little pig, little pig, let me come in!" called the wolf.

"No, no, by the hair of my chinny, chin, chin, I'll not let you in," answered the pig.

"Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house in," said the wolf.

So he huffed and he puffed and he blew the house in. Then he chased the little pig away.


[Illustration]

The third little pig that went away met a man with a load of bricks, and he said to the man, "Please, man, give me your load of bricks to build me a house."

The man gave the bricks to the little pig. Then the pig built a house with the bricks and lived in the house.

At last the wolf came along and knocked at the door of the brick house.

"Little pig, little pig, let me come in!" called the wolf.


[Illustration]

"No, no, by the hair of my chinny, chin, chin, I'll not let you in," answered the pig.

"Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house in," said the wolf.

So he huffed and he puffed and he puffed and he huffed, but he could not blow the little brick house in.

The wolf rested a few minutes, and then he said, "Little pig, little pig, will you let just the tip of my nose in?"

"No," said the little pig.

"Little pig, little pig, will you let just my paw in?"

"No," said the little pig.

"Little pig, little pig, will you let just the tip of my tail in?"

"No," said the little pig.

"Then I will climb up on the roof and come down through the chimney," said the wolf.


[Illustration]

But the little pig made the fire very hot, so the wolf could not come down the chimney so he went away, and that was the end of him.

The little pig then went and fetched his mother, and they still live happily in their little brick house.


[Illustration]