Kindergarten Read Aloud Banquet



Nursery Songs for October

Girls and Boys



Looby Light



St. Paul's Steeple



Ye Jolly Miller




A Child's Garden of Verses

Foreign Children

Little Indian, Sioux or Crow,

Little frosty Eskimo,

Little Turk or Japanee,

Oh! don't you wish that you were me?


You have seen the scarlet trees

And the lions over seas;

You have eaten ostrich eggs,

And turned the turtles off their legs.


Such a life is very fine,

But it's not so nice as mine:

You must often, as you trod,

Have wearied not  to be abroad.


You have curious things to eat,

I am fed on proper meat;

You must dwell beyond the foam,

But I am safe and live at home.


Little Indian, Sioux or Crow,

Little frosty Eskimo,

Little Turk or Japanee,

Oh! don't you wish that you were me?


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 42 Farmer Brown's Boy Makes a Discovery Market Day with Father (Part 2 of 2) The Cat and the Mouse The Haughty Ground Hog The Little Shepherd The Whole Wheat Story Joseph, the Dreamer
The King of France Ten O'Clock Scholar Peter Piper The Cat and the Fiddle One to Ten Two Blackbirds An Equal
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Frederick Richardson's Book for Children  by Frederick Richardson

[Illustration]

dropcap image HE cat and the mouse
Play'd in the malt-house:

The cat bit the mouse's tail off. "Pray, puss, give me my tail."

"No," says the cat, "I'll not give you your tail till you go to the cow and fetch me some milk."


[Illustration]

First she leapt, and then she ran,

Till she came to the cow, and thus began:

"Pray, Cow, give me milk, that I may give cat milk, that cat may give me my tail again."


[Illustration]

"No," said the cow, "I will give you no milk till you go to the farmer and get me some hay."


[Illustration]

First she leapt, and then she ran,

Till she came to the farmer, and thus began:

"Pray, Farmer, give me hay, that I may give cow hay, that cow may give me milk, that I may give cat milk, that cat may give me my own tail again."


[Illustration]

"No," says the farmer, "I'll give you no hay till you go to the butcher and fetch me some meat."

First she leapt, and then she ran,

Till she came to the butcher, and thus began:

"Pray, Butcher, give me meat, that I may give farmer meat, that farmer may give me hay, that I may give cow hay, that cow may give me milk, that I may give cat milk, that cat may give me my own tail again."

"No," says the butcher, "I'll give you no meat till you go to the baker and fetch me some bread."


[Illustration]

First she leapt, and then she ran,

Till she came to the baker, and thus began:

"Pray, Baker, give me bread, that I may give butcher bread, that butcher may give me meat, that I may give farmer meat, that farmer may give me hay, that I may give cow hay, that cow may give me milk, that I may give cat milk, that cat may give me my own tail again."


[Illustration]

"Yes," says the baker, "I'll give you some bread,

But if you eat my meal, I'll cut off your head."

Then the baker gave mouse bread, and mouse gave butcher bread, and butcher gave mouse meat, and mouse gave farmer meat, and farmer gave mouse hay, and mouse gave cow hay, and cow gave mouse milk, and mouse gave cat milk, and cat gave mouse her own tail again.


[Illustration]