First Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for July

Over the Hills and Far Away



Bo-Peep



Buy a Broom



Lucy Locket




The Owl and the Pussy-Cat

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea

In a beautiful pea-green boat:

They took some honey, and plenty of money

Wrapped up in a five-pound note.

The Owl looked up to the stars above,

And sang to a small guitar,

"O lovely Pussy, O Pussy, my love,

What a beautiful Pussy you are,

You are,

You are!

What a beautiful Pussy you are!"


Pussy said to the Owl, "You elegant fowl,

How charmingly sweet you sing!

Oh! let us be married; too long we have tarried:

But what shall we do for a ring?"

They sailed away, for a year and a day,

To the land where the bong-tree grows;

And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood,

With a ring at the end of his nose,

His nose,

His nose,

With a ring at the end of his nose.


"Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling

Your ring?" Said the Piggy, "I will."

So they took it away, and were married next day

By the Turkey who lives on the hill.

They dined on mince and slices of quince,

Which they ate with a runcible spoon;

And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,

They danced by the light of the moon,

The moon,

The moon,

They danced by the light of the moon.



  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 29 The Council with the Munchkins from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum The First Steamboat from Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans by Edward Eggleston The Wonderful Shiny Egg from Among the Farmyard People by Clara Dillingham Pierson The Hare and the Hedgehog from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Around the Fire by Lisa M. Ripperton Some Greek Colonies from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge School from The Irish Twins by Lucy Fitch Perkins Saint Christopher (Part 1 of 2) from In God's Garden by Amy Steedman
The Clucking Hen, Anonymous
The Dormouse and the Doctor by A. A. Milne
Over in the Meadow by Olive A. Wadsworth
Looking-Glass River by Robert Louis Stevenson Cradle Song by Thomas Bailey Aldrich Nonsense Alphabet by Edward Lear Hopping Frog by Christina Georgina Rossetti
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Frogs and the Ox

An Ox came down to a reedy pool to drink. As he splashed heavily into the water, he crushed a young Frog into the mud. The old Frog soon missed the little one and asked his brothers and sisters what had become of him.

"A great big  monster," said one of them, "stepped on little brother with one of his huge feet!"

"Big, was he!" said the old Frog, puffing herself up. "Was he as big as this?"


[Illustration]

"Oh, much  bigger!" they cried.

The Frog puffed up still more. "He could not have been bigger than this," she said. But the little Frogs all declared that the monster was much, much  bigger and the old Frog kept puffing herself out more and more until, all at once, she burst.

Do not attempt the impossible.