Second Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for February

The Old Woman Tossed Up in a Blanket



The Carrion Crow



Sur le Pont d'Avignon



Charley over the Water






The Rain

The rain is raining all around,

It falls on field and tree,

It rains on the umbrellas here,

And on the ships at sea.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 52 "When the Pie Was Opened, the Birds Began To Sing" from The Birds' Christmas Carol by Kate Douglas Wiggin The Birdling Flies Away from The Birds' Christmas Carol by Kate Douglas Wiggin Peter Sees Two Terrible Feathered Hunters from The Burgess Bird Book for Children by Thornton Burgess Karen Perplexed from The Christmas Porringer by Evaleen Stein The King's Messenger from Gabriel and the Hour Book by Evaleen Stein Gabriel's Christmas from Gabriel and the Hour Book by Evaleen Stein The King's Illuminator from Gabriel and the Hour Book by Evaleen Stein
Lord De la Warr's Arrival from Richard of Jamestown by James Otis
The Young Planters from Richard of Jamestown by James Otis
Little Gretchen and the Wooden Shoe from The Children's Book of Christmas Stories by Asa Don Dickinson Christmas Eve Again from The Christmas Porringer by Evaleen Stein The Porringer Finds a Resting-place from The Christmas Porringer by Evaleen Stein Sheltering Wings from The Pearl Story Book by Eleanor L. Skinner Babouscka from Christmas in Legend and Story: A Book for Boys and Girls by Elva S. Smith The Driftwood Story from The Sandman: His Sea Stories by Willliam J. Hopkins
I Saw Three Ships, Old Carol An Old English Carol, Anonymous Old King Winter by Anna E. Skinner The Glad New Year by Mary Mapes Dodge Who Loves the Trees Best?, Anonymous I Heard a Bird Sing by Oliver Herford Christmas Song by Eugene Field
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Milkmaid and Her Pail

A Milkmaid had been out to milk the cows and was returning from the field with the shining milk pail balanced nicely on her head. As she walked along, her pretty head was busy with plans for the days to come.

"This good, rich milk," she reused, "will give me plenty of cream to churn. The butter I make I will take to market, and with the money I get for it I will buy a lot of eggs for hatching. How nice it will be when they are all hatched and the yard is full of fine young chicks. Then when May day comes I will sell them, and with the money I'll buy a lovely new dress to wear to the fair. All the young men will look at me. They will come and try to make love to me,—but I shall very quickly send them about their business!"

As she thought of how she would settle that matter, she tossed her head scornfully, and down fell the pail of milk to the ground. And all the milk flowed out, and with it vanished butter and eggs and chicks and new dress and all the milkmaid's pride.

Do not count your chickens before they are hatched.


[Illustration]