Second Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for April

Little Jack Horner



The Little Disaster



My Pretty Maid



The Ploughboy in Luck




Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star

Twinkle, twinkle, little star;

How I wonder what you are!

Up above the world so high,

Like a diamond in the sky!


When the blazing sun is set,

And the grass with dew is wet,

Then you show your little light,

Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.


In the dark blue sky you keep,

And often through my curtains peep,

For you never shut your eye

Till the sun is in the sky.


Then if I were in the dark,

I would thank you for your spark;

I could not see which way to go,

If you did not twinkle so.


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Week 52 "When the Pie Was Opened, the Birds Began To Sing" from The Birds' Christmas Carol by Kate Douglas Wiggin The Birdling Flies Away from The Birds' Christmas Carol by Kate Douglas Wiggin Peter Sees Two Terrible Feathered Hunters from The Burgess Bird Book for Children by Thornton Burgess Seasonal Story Seasonal Story Seasonal Story Seasonal Story
Lord De la Warr's Arrival from Richard of Jamestown by James Otis
The Young Planters from Richard of Jamestown by James Otis
Seasonal Story Seasonal Story Seasonal Story Seasonal Story Seasonal Story The Driftwood Story from The Sandman: His Sea Stories by Willliam J. Hopkins
Seasonal Poem Seasonal Poem   Seasonal Poem Seasonal Poem Seasonal Poem Seasonal Poem
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Two Goats

Two Goats, frisking gayly on the rocky steeps of a mountain valley, chanced to meet, one on each side of a deep chasm through which poured a mighty mountain torrent. The trunk of a fallen tree formed the only means of crossing the chasm, and on this not even two squirrels could have passed each other in safety. The narrow path would have made the bravest tremble. Not so our Goats. Their pride would not permit either to stand aside for the other.

One set her foot on the log. The other did likewise. In the middle they met horn to horn. Neither would give way, and so they both fell, to be swept away by the roaring torrent below.

It is better to yield than to come to misfortune through stubbornness.


[Illustration]