Second Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for February

The Old Woman Tossed Up in a Blanket



The Carrion Crow



Sur le Pont d'Avignon



Charley over the Water






Elf and Dormouse

Under a toadstool

Crept a wee Elf,

Out of the rain

To shelter himself.


Under the toadstool,

Sound asleep,

Sat a big Dormouse

All in a heap.


Trembled the wee Elf

Frightened, and yet

Fearing to fly away

Lest he get wet.


To the next shelter

Maybe a mile

Sudden the wee Elf

Smiled a wee smile.


Tugged till the toadstool

Toppled in two

Holding it over him

Gayly he flew.


Soon he was safe home,

Dry as could be.

Soon woke the Dormouse

"Good gracious me!


Where is my toadstool!"

Loud he lamented,

And that's how umbrellas

First were invented.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 52 "When the Pie Was Opened, the Birds Began To Sing" from The Birds' Christmas Carol by Kate Douglas Wiggin The Birdling Flies Away from The Birds' Christmas Carol by Kate Douglas Wiggin Peter Sees Two Terrible Feathered Hunters from The Burgess Bird Book for Children by Thornton Burgess Karen Perplexed from The Christmas Porringer by Evaleen Stein The King's Messenger from Gabriel and the Hour Book by Evaleen Stein Gabriel's Christmas from Gabriel and the Hour Book by Evaleen Stein The King's Illuminator from Gabriel and the Hour Book by Evaleen Stein
Lord De la Warr's Arrival from Richard of Jamestown by James Otis
The Young Planters from Richard of Jamestown by James Otis
Little Gretchen and the Wooden Shoe from The Children's Book of Christmas Stories by Asa Don Dickinson Christmas Eve Again from The Christmas Porringer by Evaleen Stein The Porringer Finds a Resting-place from The Christmas Porringer by Evaleen Stein Sheltering Wings from The Pearl Story Book by Eleanor L. Skinner Babouscka from Christmas in Legend and Story: A Book for Boys and Girls by Elva S. Smith The Driftwood Story from The Sandman: His Sea Stories by Willliam J. Hopkins
I Saw Three Ships, Old Carol An Old English Carol, Anonymous Old King Winter by Anna E. Skinner The Glad New Year by Mary Mapes Dodge Who Loves the Trees Best?, Anonymous I Heard a Bird Sing by Oliver Herford Christmas Song by Eugene Field
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Ass and the Load of Salt

A Merchant, driving his Ass homeward from the seashore with a heavy load of salt, came to a river crossed by a shallow ford. They had crossed this river many times before without accident, but this time the Ass slipped and fell when halfway over. And when the Merchant at last got him to his feet, much of the salt had melted away. Delighted to find how much lighter his burden had become, the Ass finished the journey very gayly.

Next day the Merchant went for another load of salt. On the way home the Ass, remembering what had happened at the ford, purposely let himself fall into the water, and again got rid of most of his burden.

The angry Merchant immediately turned about and drove the Ass back to the seashore, where he loaded him with two great baskets of sponges. At the ford the Ass again tumbled over; but when he had scrambled to his feet, it was a very disconsolate Ass that dragged himself homeward under a load ten times heavier than before.

The same measures will not suit all circumstances.


[Illustration]

The Ass and the Load of Salt