Second Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for September


The Months

January brings the snow,

Makes our feet and fingers glow.


February brings the rain,

Thaws the frozen lake again.


March brings breezes loud and shrill,

Tp stir the dancing daffodil.


April brings the primrose sweet,

Scatters daises at our feet.


May brings flocks of pretty lambs,

Skipping by their fleecy damns.


June brings tulips, lilies, roses,

Fills the children's hands with posies.


Hot July brings cooling showers,

Apricots and gillyflowers.


August brings the sheaves of corn,

Then the harvest home is borne.


Warm September brings the fruit,

Sportsmen then begin to shoot.


Fresh October brings the pheasent,

Then to gather nuts is pleasent.


Dull November brings the blast,

Then the leaves are whirling fast.


Chill December brings the sleet,

Blazing fire, and Christmas treat.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 52 "When the Pie Was Opened, the Birds Began To Sing" from The Birds' Christmas Carol by Kate Douglas Wiggin The Birdling Flies Away from The Birds' Christmas Carol by Kate Douglas Wiggin Peter Sees Two Terrible Feathered Hunters from The Burgess Bird Book for Children by Thornton Burgess Karen Perplexed from The Christmas Porringer by Evaleen Stein The King's Messenger from Gabriel and the Hour Book by Evaleen Stein Gabriel's Christmas from Gabriel and the Hour Book by Evaleen Stein The King's Illuminator from Gabriel and the Hour Book by Evaleen Stein
Lord De la Warr's Arrival from Richard of Jamestown by James Otis
The Young Planters from Richard of Jamestown by James Otis
The Legend of King Wenceslaus from The Pearl Story Book by Eleanor L. Skinner Christmas Eve Again from The Christmas Porringer by Evaleen Stein The Porringer Finds a Resting-place from The Christmas Porringer by Evaleen Stein Sheltering Wings from The Pearl Story Book by Eleanor L. Skinner Babouscka from For the Children's Hour by Carolyn Sherwin Bailey The Driftwood Story from The Sandman: His Sea Stories by Willliam J. Hopkins
I Saw Three Ships, Old Carol An Old English Carol, Anonymous Old King Winter by Anna E. Skinner The Glad New Year by Mary Mapes Dodge Who Loves the Trees Best?, Anonymous I Heard a Bird Sing by Oliver Herford Christmas Song by Eugene Field
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Tortoise and the Ducks

The Tortoise, you know, carries his house on his back. No matter how hard he tries, he cannot leave home. They say that Jupiter punished him so, because he was such a lazy stay-at-home that he would not go to Jupiter's wedding, even when especially invited.

After many years, Tortoise began to wish he had gone to that wedding. When he saw how gaily the birds flew about and how the Hare and the Chipmunk and all the other animals ran nimbly by, always eager to see everything there was to be seen, the Tortoise felt very sad and discontented. He wanted to see the world too, and there he was with a house on his back and little short legs that could hardly drag him along.

One day he met a pair of Ducks and told them all his trouble.

"We can help you to see the world," said the Ducks. "Take hold of this stick with your teeth and we will carry you far up in the air where you can see the whole countryside. But keep quiet or you will be sorry."

The Tortoise was very glad indeed. He seized the stick firmly with his teeth, the two Ducks took hold of it one at each end, and away they sailed up toward the clouds.


[Illustration]

Just then a Crow flew by. He was very much astonished at the strange sight and cried:

"This must surely be the King of Tortoises!"

"Why certainly—" began the Tortoise.

But as he opened his mouth to say these foolish words he lost his hold on the stick, and down he fell to the ground, where he was dashed to pieces on a rock.

Foolish curiosity and vanity often lead to misfortune.