Second Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for April

Little Jack Horner



The Little Disaster



My Pretty Maid



The Ploughboy in Luck






Bunches of Grapes

"Bunches of grapes," says Timothy:

"Pomegranates pink," says Elaine;

"A junket of cream and a cranberry tart

For me," says Jane.


"Love-in-a-mist," says Timothy:

"Primroses pale," says Elaine;

"A nosegay of pinks and mignonette

For me," says Jane.


"Chariots of gold," says Timothy:

"Silvery wings," says Elaine;

"A bumpity ride in a wagon of hay

For me," says Jane.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 1 Master Cherry Finds a Piece of Wood from Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi King Alfred and the Cakes from Fifty Famous Stories Retold by James Baldwin The Fall of Snow from The Seasons: Winter by Jane Marcet The Coming of Crow-feather-Cloak from The Girl Who Sat by the Ashes by Padraic Colum Two Young Romans from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge Aunt Harriet Has a Cough (Part 1 of 3) from Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher The Story of a Scarlet Cord from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Baby from Viking Tales by Jennie Hall Chickadee Dee Dee (Part 1 of 3) from Outdoor Visits by Edith M. Patch The Wolf and the Kid from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter I Wish To Be a Sailor from Robinson Crusoe Written Anew for Children by James Baldwin Daedalus and Icarus from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price Happy Jack Squirrel Makes a Find from The Adventures of Prickly Porky by Thornton Burgess The Ship-Building Story from The Sandman: His Ship Stories by Willliam J. Hopkins
The New Year by Alfred Lord Tennyson The Duel by Eugene Field The Purple Cow by Gelett Burgess
The New Year by Dinah Mulock
Trees by Walter de la Mare Winter by Alfred Lord Tennyson Cradle Hymn by Isaac Watts
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Frogs and the Ox

An Ox came down to a reedy pool to drink. As he splashed heavily into the water, he crushed a young Frog into the mud. The old Frog soon missed the little one and asked his brothers and sisters what had become of him.

"A great big  monster," said one of them, "stepped on little brother with one of his huge feet!"

"Big, was he!" said the old Frog, puffing herself up. "Was he as big as this?"


[Illustration]

"Oh, much  bigger!" they cried.

The Frog puffed up still more. "He could not have been bigger than this," she said. But the little Frogs all declared that the monster was much, much  bigger and the old Frog kept puffing herself out more and more until, all at once, she burst.

Do not attempt the impossible.