Second Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for September


The Land of Nod

From breakfast on through all the day

At home among my friends I stay,

But every night I go abroad

Afar into the land of Nod.


All by myself I have to go,

With none to tell me what to do—

All alone beside the streams

And up the mountain-sides of dreams.


The strangest things are there for me,

Both things to eat and things to see,

And many frightening sights abroad

Till morning in the land of Nod.


Try as I like to find the way,

I never can get back by day,

Nor can remember plain and clear

The curious music that I hear.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 1 Master Cherry Finds a Piece of Wood from Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi King Alfred and the Cakes from Fifty Famous Stories Retold by James Baldwin The Fall of Snow from The Seasons: Winter by Jane Marcet The Coming of Crow-feather-Cloak from The Girl Who Sat by the Ashes by Padraic Colum Two Young Romans from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge Aunt Harriet Has a Cough (Part 1 of 3) from Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher The Story of a Scarlet Cord from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Baby from Viking Tales by Jennie Hall Chickadee Dee Dee (Part 1 of 3) from Outdoor Visits by Edith M. Patch The Wolf and the Kid from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter I Wish To Be a Sailor from Robinson Crusoe Written Anew for Children by James Baldwin Daedalus and Icarus from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price Happy Jack Squirrel Makes a Find from The Adventures of Prickly Porky by Thornton Burgess The Ship-Building Story from The Sandman: His Ship Stories by Willliam J. Hopkins
The New Year by Alfred Lord Tennyson The Duel by Eugene Field The Purple Cow by Gelett Burgess
The New Year by Dinah Mulock
Trees by Walter de la Mare Winter by Alfred Lord Tennyson Cradle Hymn by Isaac Watts
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Fox and the Goat

A Fox fell into a well, and though it was not very deep, he found that he could not get out again. After he had been in the well a long time, a thirsty Goat came by. The Goat thought the Fox had gone down to drink, and so he asked if the water was good.


[Illustration]

"The finest in the whole country," said the crafty Fox, "jump in and try it. There is more than enough for both of us."

The thirsty Goat immediately jumped in and began to drink. The Fox just as quickly jumped on the Goat's back and leaped from the tip of the Goat's horns out of the well.

The foolish Goat now saw what a plight he had got into, and begged the Fox to help him out. But the Fox was already on his way to the woods.

"If you had as much sense as you have beard, old fellow," he said as he ran, "you would have been more cautious about finding a way to get out again before you jumped in."

Look before you leap.