Second Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for May


The Land of Counterpane

When I was sick and lay a-bed,

I had two pillows at my head,

And all my toys beside me lay,

To keep me happy all the day.


And sometimes for an hour or so

I watched my leaden soldiers go,

With different uniforms and drills,

Among the bed-clothes, through the hills;


And sometimes sent my ships in fleets

All up and down among the sheets;

Or brought my trees and houses out,

And planted cities all about.


I was the giant great and still

That sits upon the pillow-hill,

And sees before him, dale and plain,

The pleasant land of counterpane.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 1 Master Cherry Finds a Piece of Wood from Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi King Alfred and the Cakes from Fifty Famous Stories Retold by James Baldwin The Fall of Snow from The Seasons: Winter by Jane Marcet The Coming of Crow-feather-Cloak from The Girl Who Sat by the Ashes by Padraic Colum Two Young Romans from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge Aunt Harriet Has a Cough (Part 1 of 3) from Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher The Story of a Scarlet Cord from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Baby from Viking Tales by Jennie Hall Chickadee Dee Dee (Part 1 of 3) from Outdoor Visits by Edith M. Patch The Wolf and the Kid from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter I Wish To Be a Sailor from Robinson Crusoe Written Anew for Children by James Baldwin Daedalus and Icarus from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price Happy Jack Squirrel Makes a Find from The Adventures of Prickly Porky by Thornton Burgess The Ship-Building Story from The Sandman: His Ship Stories by Willliam J. Hopkins
The New Year by Alfred Lord Tennyson The Duel by Eugene Field The Purple Cow by Gelett Burgess
The New Year by Dinah Mulock
Trees by Walter de la Mare Winter by Alfred Lord Tennyson Cradle Hymn by Isaac Watts
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Two Goats

Two Goats, frisking gayly on the rocky steeps of a mountain valley, chanced to meet, one on each side of a deep chasm through which poured a mighty mountain torrent. The trunk of a fallen tree formed the only means of crossing the chasm, and on this not even two squirrels could have passed each other in safety. The narrow path would have made the bravest tremble. Not so our Goats. Their pride would not permit either to stand aside for the other.

One set her foot on the log. The other did likewise. In the middle they met horn to horn. Neither would give way, and so they both fell, to be swept away by the roaring torrent below.

It is better to yield than to come to misfortune through stubbornness.


[Illustration]