Second Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for January

I Had a Little Nut Tree



The Four Presents



Little Man and Maid



The Jolly Tester




The Purple Cow

I never saw a purple cow.

I never hope to see one.

But I can tell you anyhow

I'd rather see than be one.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 1 Master Cherry Finds a Piece of Wood from Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi King Alfred and the Cakes from Fifty Famous Stories Retold by James Baldwin The Fall of Snow from The Seasons: Winter by Jane Marcet The Coming of Crow-feather-Cloak from The Girl Who Sat by the Ashes by Padraic Colum Two Young Romans from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge Aunt Harriet Has a Cough (Part 1 of 3) from Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher The Story of a Scarlet Cord from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
The Baby from Viking Tales by Jennie Hall Chickadee Dee Dee (Part 1 of 3) from Outdoor Visits by Edith M. Patch The Wolf and the Kid from The Aesop for Children by Milo Winter I Wish To Be a Sailor from Robinson Crusoe Written Anew for Children by James Baldwin Daedalus and Icarus from A Child's Book of Myths and Enchantment Tales by Margaret Evans Price Happy Jack Squirrel Makes a Find from The Adventures of Prickly Porky by Thornton Burgess The Ship-Building Story from The Sandman: His Ship Stories by Willliam J. Hopkins
The New Year by Alfred Lord Tennyson The Duel by Eugene Field The Purple Cow by Gelett Burgess
The New Year by Dinah Mulock
Trees by Walter de la Mare Winter by Alfred Lord Tennyson Cradle Hymn by Isaac Watts
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Frederick Richardson's Book for Children  by Frederick Richardson

[Illustration]

dropcap image FOX was digging behind a stump, and he found a bumble-bee. The fox put the bumble-bee in a bag and he traveled.

The first house he came to he went in, and he said to the mistress of the house: "May I leave my bag here while I go to Squintum's?"

"Yes," said the woman.

"Then be careful not to open the bag," said the fox.

As soon as the fox was out of sight, the woman took a little peep in the bag and out flew the bumble-bee, and the rooster caught him and ate him up.


[Illustration]

After a while the fox came back. He took up his bag and he saw that his bumble-bee was gone, and he said to the woman: "Where is my bumble-bee?"


[Illustration]

And the woman said: "I just untied the bag, and the bumble-bee flew out, and the rooster ate him up."

"Very well," said the fox, "I must have the rooster, then."

So he caught the rooster and put him in his bag, and traveled.


[Illustration]

And the next house he came to he went in, and said to the mistress of the house: "May I leave my bag here while I go to Squintum's?"

"Yes," said the woman.

"Then be careful not to open the bag," said the fox. But as soon as the fox was out of sight, the woman just took a little peep into the bag, and the rooster flew out, and the pig caught him and ate him up.


[Illustration]

After a while the fox came back, and he took up his bag and he saw that the rooster was not in it, and he said to the woman: "Where is my rooster?"

And the woman said: "I just untied the bag, and the rooster flew out, and the pig ate him."

"Very well," said the fox, "I must have the pig, then."

So he caught the pig and put him in his bag, and traveled.


[Illustration]

And the next house he came to he went in, and said to the mistress of the house: "May I leave my bag here while I go to Squintum's?"

"Yes," said the woman.

"Then be careful not to open the bag," said the fox.

But as soon as the fox was out of sight, the woman just took a little peep into the bag, and the pig jumped out, and the ox ate him.

After a while the fox came back. He took up his bag and he saw that the pig was gone, and he said to the woman: "Where is my pig?"

And the woman said: "I just untied the bag, and the pig jumped out, and the ox ate him."

"Very well," said the fox, "I must have the ox, then."

So he caught the ox and put him in his bag, and traveled.

And the next house he came to he went in, and said to the mistress of the house: "May I leave my bag here while I go to Squintum's?"

"Yes," said the woman.

"Then be careful not to open the bag," said the fox.

But as soon as the fox was out of sight, the woman just took a little peep in the bag, and the ox got out, and the woman's little boy chased him away off over the fields.


[Illustration]

After a while the fox came back. He took up his bag and he saw that his ox was gone, and he said to the woman: "Where is my ox?"


[Illustration]

And the woman said: "I just untied the string, and the ox got out, and my little boy chased him away off over the fields."

"Very well," said the fox, "I must have the little boy, then."

So he caught the little boy and put him in his bag, and traveled.


[Illustration]

And the next house he came to he went in, and said to the mistress of the house: "May I leave my bag here while I go to Squintum's?"

"Yes," said the woman.

"Then be careful not to open the bag," said the fox.

The woman was making cake, and her children were around her asking for some.

"Oh, mother, give me a piece," said one; and, "Oh, mother, give me a piece," said the others.

And the smell of the cake came to the little boy who was weeping and crying in the bag, and he heard the children asking for cake and he said: "Oh, mammy, give me a piece."

Then the woman opened the bag and took the little boy out, and she put the house-dog in the bag in the little boy's place.

And the little boy stopped crying and had some cake with the others.

After a while the fox came back. He took up his bag and he saw that it was tied fast, and he put it over his back and traveled far into the deep woods. Then he sat down and untied the bag, and if the little boy had been there in the bag things would have gone badly with him.

But the little boy was safe at the woman's house, and when the fox untied the bag the house-dog jumped out and ate him all up.


[Illustration]