First Grade Read Aloud Banquet



Songs for June

Tom, the Piper's Son



The Fly and the Humble Bee



Oranges and Lemons



Three Blind Mice




Where Go the Boats?

Dark brown is the river,

Golden is the sand.

It flows along for ever,

With trees on either hand.


Green leaves a-floating,

Castles of the foam,

Boats of mine a-boating—

Where will all come home?


On goes the river

And out past the mill,

Away down the valley,

Away down the hill.


Away down the river,

A hundred miles or more,

Other little children

Shall bring my boats ashore.


  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 25 Smells from The Story of Doctor Dolittle by Hugh Lofting Stories about Jefferson from Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans by Edward Eggleston Peanuts from Seed-Babies by Margaret Warner Morley The Hut in the Forest from Fairy Tales Too Good To Miss—Around the Fire by Lisa M. Ripperton The Battle of Marathon from On the Shores of the Great Sea by M. B. Synge The Twins Get Home from The Irish Twins by Lucy Fitch Perkins The Beautiful Baby Who Was Found in a River from Hurlbut's Story of the Bible by Jesse Lyman Hurlbut
White Sheep, Anonymous
Hoppity by A. A. Milne
Who Stole the Bird's Nest? by Lydia Maria Child
My Shadow by Robert Louis Stevenson Summer by Christina Georgina Rossetti The House That Jack Built, Anonymous King and Queen by Christina Georgina Rossetti
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The Aesop for Children  by Milo Winter

The Fox and the Stork

The Fox one day thought of a plan to amuse himself at the expense of the Stork, at whose odd appearance he was always laughing.

"You must come and dine with me today," he said to the Stork, smiling to himself at the trick he was going to play. The Stork gladly accepted the invitation and arrived in good time and with a very good appetite.

For dinner the Fox served soup. But it was set out in a very shallow dish, and all the Stork could do was to wet the very tip of his bill. Not a drop of soup could he get. But the Fox lapped it up easily, and, to increase the disappointment of the Stork, made a great show of enjoyment.


[Illustration]

The hungry Stork was much displeased at the trick, but he was a calm, even-tempered fellow and saw no good in flying into a rage. Instead, not long afterward, he invited the Fox to dine with him in turn. The Fox arrived promptly at the time that had been set, and the Stork served a fish dinner that had a very appetizing smell. But it was served in a tall jar with a very narrow neck. The Stork could easily get at the food with his long bill, but all the Fox could do was to lick the outside of the jar, and sniff at the delicious odor. And when the Fox lost his temper, the Stork said calmly:

Do not play tricks on your neighbors unless you can stand the same treatment yourself.


[Illustration]